The Eyre Affair PDF Ô The Eyre Kindle -

Great Britain circa 1985 time travel is routine cloning is a reality dodos are the resurrected pet of choice and literature is taken very very seriously Baconians are trying to convince the world that Francis Bacon really wrote Shakespeare there are riots between the Surrealists and Impressionists and thousands of men are named John Milton an homage to the real Milton and a very confusing situation for the police Amidst all this Acheron Hades Third Most Wanted Man In the World steals the original manuscript of Martin Chuzzlewit and kills a minor character who then disappears from every volume of the novel ever printed But that's just a prelude Hades' real target is the beloved Jane Eyre and it's not long before he plucks her from the pages of Bronte's novel Enter Thursday Next She's the Special Operative's renowned literary detective and she drives a Porsche With the help of her uncle Mycroft's Prose Portal Thursday enters the novel to rescue Jane Eyre from this heinous act of literary homicide It's tricky business all these interlopers running about Thornfield and deceptions run rampant as their paths cross with Jane Rochester and Miss Fairfax Can Thursday save Jane Eyre and Bronte's masterpiece? And what of the Crimean War? Will it ever end? And what about those annoying black holes that pop up now and again sucking things into time space voids Suspenseful and outlandish absorbing and fun The Eyre Affair is a caper unlike any other and an introduction to the imagination of a most distinctive writer and his singular fictional universe


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    I read this years ago I think it was back around 2005 or so I remember liking the book fairly well even though I'd never read Jane Eyre and a modest part of the book's plot touches on that story But I also remember being irritated at the book Something made me bristle when I read it Some elements of the storytelling rubbed me the wrong way I remember talking to the person who recommended the book to me I held it book up and said rather disdainfully This is probably really popular isn't it? My friend who worked in a bookstore said that no actually it wasn't all that popular And as soon as she said that I liked the book Thinking back this memory disturbs me And not only because it revealed a disturbing tendency towards the bullshit hipster I only like things nobody else likes mindset Worse than that I think it shows that I was getting a bit twisted up inside because of my inability to get my book published You see by the time 2005 rolled around I'd been working on The Name of the Wind for about 11 years 3 of those years I'd had an agent and had been really really trying to get published And it wasn't going so well Well actually that's not true It was going well because I was on the road to being the published author I am today But I didn't know that in 2005 Back then all I knew is that I wasn't published yet and because of that I was getting a little bitter Well to be fair I was probably than a little bitter I was twisted up enough inside that even the perceived success of a book was enough to make it unpalatable to me Which is a real shame because jump forward to now and I've been listening to the series as an audiobook and enjoying it immensely It's well written and quickly paced There's both humor and wit in ample supply And the world is a delightfully tounge in cheek wish fulfillment alternate earth where the entire populace is passionately engaged in literature There are museums dedicated to authors political parties court the Chaucer block of voters and Baconians go door to door trying to convert people to their philosophy namely that Fredrick Bacon is the man who actually penned the plays credited to Shakespeare Short version If you're a recovering English major or if you're just well read odds are you're going to enjoy this book Ditto if you're a writer provided you're not the sort of twisted up bitter type of writer I was back in 2005